‘Painful’ Pauline Hanson pic dividing Aussies

Albanese claimed $17k to stay in his own flat

Big hint on when tourists will be back

China has spoken out in support of Russia’s impending invasion of Ukraine, insisting the “outdated” NATO alliance is the true cause of the crisis.

Foreign Minister Wang Yi told US Secretary of State Antony Blinken that Russia’s “reasonable security concerns should be taken seriously and resolved”.

He did not refer to European and Ukrainian security concerns over Moscow’s 100,000 troops, heavy tanks, armoured vehicles, combat aircraft and warships assembling on their borders.

“We call on all parties to stay calm and refrain from doing things that agitate tensions and hype up the crisis,” he said.

Within hours, his Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian was hyping the crisis.

He said Moscow was acting in response to “legitimate security concerns” over what was a “Cold War remnant”.

“As the world’s largest military alliance, NATO should abandon the outdated Cold War mentality and ideological bias, and do things that are conducive to upholding peace and stability.”

‘Painful’ Pauline Hanson pic dividing Aussies

Albanese claimed $17k to stay in his own flat

Big hint on when tourists will be back

China has spoken out in support of Russia’s impending invasion of Ukraine, insisting the “outdated” NATO alliance is the true cause of the crisis.

Foreign Minister Wang Yi told US Secretary of State Antony Blinken that Russia’s “reasonable security concerns should be taken seriously and resolved”.

He did not refer to European and Ukrainian security concerns over Moscow’s 100,000 troops, heavy tanks, armoured vehicles, combat aircraft and warships assembling on their borders.

“We call on all parties to stay calm and refrain from doing things that agitate tensions and hype up the crisis,” he said.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian. Picture: Greg Baker/AFP

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian. Picture: Greg Baker/AFP

Within hours, his Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian was hyping the crisis.

He said Moscow was acting in response to “legitimate security concerns” over what was a “Cold War remnant”.

“As the world’s largest military alliance, NATO should abandon the outdated Cold War mentality and ideological bias, and do things that are conducive to upholding peace and stability.”https://www.youtube.com/embed/bYuNNMmbi-o

Meanwhile, Moscow began issuing demands.

President Vladimir Putin wants to divide Europe into spheres of influence. The desires of the nations caught between the two are irrelevant.

Beijing has publicly backed the move.

US Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman had earlier stated Putin’s demands that the alliance reject any further applications for membership as “a non-starter”.

“We will not allow anyone to slam closed NATO’s open-door policy.”

Small East European nations such as Latvia, Lithuania and Belarus have been applying for NATO’s protection. It’s a response to the Russian leader’s efforts to bring the former Soviet Union states back under Moscow’s control. And long-neutral Sweden and Finland have been debating the move in light of Putin’s increasingly aggressive behaviour.

“China firmly opposes all kinds of small cliques,” Zhao said. Though he went on to describe Beijing’s growing relationship with Moscow as “mature, stable and resilient”.

Chairman Xi will greet President Putin at an official visit to the Winter Olympics opening ceremony.

Chinese UN representative Zhang Jun this week said Moscow had promised Beijing it would not upset the two-week event by invading Ukraine.

“Concerning the situation in Ukraine, we have heard from Russia that it is not their intention to launch any war,” he said.

The two have been at great pains to emphasise their growing relationship in recent years. That’s despite a long-term dispute over who owns Russia’s eastern provinces.

The relationship is yet to be formalised by an alliance. But recent large-scale combined military exercises demonstrate a desire for their forces to work together.

Most of Beijing’s support for Moscow has been in global posturing and propaganda contests.

It accuses Washington of being in decline. Of not knowing how to react to Russia and China’s rise.